Casement vs Hung vs Sliding vs Awing Windows

Pros and Cons of different Operational Windows
If you're considering the replacement of your home's windows and pondering which type of operational window will best serve your needs, here are a few points that may help you make the right decision.

Casement Windows

Casement windows are the most popular, most typical operational window used in residential homes today. They open out sideways up to 90 degrees. They are attractive, secure and tend to provide better energy efficiency than hung, slider and awning windows that are configured with standard glass and gas fills. These windows are almost always used at the front of a home.

Pros

  • The screen is on the inside of the window and is easily removed from inside the home.
  • Most secure operational window available.
  • Typically incorporate multi-locking mechanism controlled by one latch
  • Classy, clean look from inside and outside

Cons

  • When left open in extreme wind conditions, these windows act as air breaks and tend to amplify the sound of the wind
  • When open, can protrude into exterior high-traffic areas (decks, stairways, lawn) outside the home
  • Exterior window washing typically will have to be done from the outside, however, many window manufacturers have designed their windows so that when open at 90 degrees, you may be able to reach and wash the exterior, provided you arm is thin, and the window is not too wide

Hung Windows

Hung windows are the most traditional window of all operational windows. In the past up until more recent history, they were the only operational window available and would appear on all sides of the home. They move vertically up and down.

Pros

  • Very easy to operate by hand, no crank handle required
  • Available in a single-hung, double-hung and tilt configuration to meet requirements
  • Double-hung windows can be cleaned (outside and inside) from within your home
  • An excellent solution when you don’t want a window protruding out of a home into an outdoor living area
  • Perfect for a classical, more traditional window look
  • Self-locking mechanism option makes them very easy to lock and unlock windows

Cons

  • The screen is on the outside of the window and may take away from the aesthetics of a home
  • The screen is more prone to exterior environmental conditions, dirt, projectiles
  • The area behind the screen is more prone to collecting dirt and dust
  • These windows are vertical in nature, there are minimum height restrictions
  • With double hung windows both upper and lower sash must be completely closed in order to lock
  • Can’t lock windows in open position
  • To make windows as efficient as other operational windows the gas inside the pane must be upgraded from Argon to Krypton

Sliding Windows

Sliding windows are very similar to hung windows, with the exception that they move horizontally rather than vertical. Slider windows are typically used in basements or the sides and back of the home.

Pros

  • Very easy to operate by hand, no crank handle required
  • Available in a single-slider, double-slider and tilt configuration to meet requirements
  • Double slider windows can be cleaned (both outside and inside) from within your home
  • An excellent solution when you don’t want a window protruding out of a home into an outdoor living area
  • Self-locking mechanism option makes it very easy to lock and unlock windows

Cons

  • The screen is on the outside of the window and may take away from the aesthetics of a home
  • The screen is more prone to exterior environmental conditions, dirt, projectiles
  • The area behind the screen is more prone to collecting dirt and dust
  • These windows are horizontal in nature, there are minimal width restrictions
  • With double hung windows both upper and lower sash must be completely closed in order to lock
  • Can’t lock windows in open position
  • To make windows as efficient as other operational windows the gas inside the pane must be upgraded from Argon to Krypton

Awning Windows

Awning windows have increased in popularity over the years, especially for homes of a more modern nature.  they are great for bathrooms and areas that require a higher window placement. They open and lock from the bottom and when open, they create an almost roof like appearance. They also provide great ventilation and they are perfect for wet weather and moderate wind. Awning windows are often placed higher on a wall than other types of windows, and they are a great mix when a wall of windows is part of the home’s design.

Pros

  • Opening the window is a breeze with a standard twist crank or slide crank depending on the manufacturer
  • An excellent solution when for bathrooms (with privacy glass option)
  • Excellent ventilation
  • Better weather protection than most other types of operational windows
  • The screen is on the inside of the window and is easily removed from inside the home
  • Windows can be wide or thin

Cons

  • When open, can protrude into exterior high-traffic areas (decks, stairways, lawn) outside the home
  • Typically requires at least 2 locking mechanisms on each side of the window