Bayview Glossary

Air infiltration


Air that leaks in and out of a structure through wall cracks and windows or doors is considered "infiltration". The lower a window’s air infiltration rating, the more airtight it is.

Argon gas


Argon gas

Argon is an odorless, colorless, non-toxic inert gas used in the window manufacturing industry to fill the empty spaces between glass panes. Because of it's properties it will increase insulation and energy efficiency in a window. An alternative to Argon is Krypton, which is a little more expensive, but is a better insulator.

Awning Window


Awning Window

Awning windows are an excellent choice for increasing light and ventilation into your home. On their own, or in combination with other types of windows, awning windows can be installed above or below other windows, or above doors. They are hinged at the top and open outwards at the bottom.

Bay Window


Bay Window

A bay window is a window made up of two angle framed window sides running at 30 or 45 degrees and a framed front window that runs parallel to the outer wall of the home to form polygonal shape.

Bow Window


Bow Window

A bow window is a home extrusion comprised of any combination of four to six individual casement or picture windows joined together to form a semicircle.

Cam lock


The device that pulls the sash together when being closed.

Cam locks


Cam locks are thumb-turn locks that are traditionally used on horizontal and vertical sliding (slider) windows. They tighten the interior and exterior sashes together to provide superior locking security and reduce drafts.

Casement Window


Casement Window

A casement is a window is a window that is attached to its frame by one or more hinges at one side.

Cladding


Cladding is a layer of vinyl, aluminum, or fiberglass that is applied to the out side of certain types of windows. It protects the exterior of a wood or composite windows and is made of vinyl, aluminum, or fiberglass, eliminating painting.

Condensation (window)


Condensation (window)

Window condensation occurs when the surface temperature of the window frame, glass or sash is lower than that of the humid that touches it. The moisture vapor in the air changes into liquid water on contact with these cold surfaces. In extreme temperature differentials, condensation can build up and freeze. Energy-efficient windows can also occasionally have condensation on the exterior glass surface during periods of warm weather and high humidity.